Home  Search Level 0  Level 1  Level 2  Level 3  Level 4  Level 4Pro  Level 5  C/Sing  Solo

| Tech terms | Scales | Axioms | Drills | Checksheets | Processes | Prep. lists | C/S terms | C/S tool | Grades | Cramm | Points | KTW | Online |

to end

 

Correction Lists and their Use

 

Definition:
Correction List, 1.
A list of prepared questions on a printed form which is used by the auditor for the repair of a specified situation, action, or Rundown. 2. The various Prepared Lists are designed to find By-passed Charge and repair a faulty auditing action or a life situation. 3. One additional use of some major Correction Lists is, to analyze a case and get data about pc's case difficulties. This is done under the C/S' instructions in order to program future auditing.
'Correction Lists, 'Prepared Lists' and 'Repair Lists' are 3 names for the same thing.


There are a number of prepared lists available to the auditor. In a broader sense you can see each process sheet for a Grade as a prepared list. The interview form, called the PC Information Sheet in CT, is also an example. There are actually many others. Such a list gives the auditor an overall plan of how to tackle a certain auditing situation or case problem and helps the C/S to plot a clear and workable course with a high guarantee of success.

The subject of this chapter is specifically Correction Lists as defined above. Included here on CT 0-3 are a number of such lists. They can be used to correct an ongoing auditing action. Examples are L1C - it can handle an upset in the session (and in life too). On Level 2 we covered the Confessional Repair List (LCRE), designed to sort out problems in confessional auditing. There are many other such Correction Lists. The most important ones are described in this chapter and included in the Appendix. Additional lists are included in CT-4Pro intended for more advanced use.

Another use of Correction Lists is (definition #3 above), is to make an analysis of a case and its problems. The C/S can simply order a number of Correction Lists to be assessed on a pc and returned to him for study.  The reads and the printed instructions help him work out a whole auditing program.

There are a lot of know-how and experience built into these lists. In a situation with problems on a particular auditing action or difficulties with a pc's progress, they are the stable datum on how to resolve the situation. They are 'proven medicine', like penicillin against infection, you could say.

Basic Principle
The basic principle you operate on is: "When in doubt - assess a Correction List".
For it to be BPC it has to be charge in restimulation. This will show up on the Meter. In the previous chapter we had: "Charge is energy that is mobilized and meant to go in a certain direction. But it never arrives, because it is not wholly detected or understood" - that is, not until now! Ask the question which describes it and you will get a good read. Indicate it by taking it up (or simply indicating it) and the pc will be able to confront the charge and spot the source of it. The charge will destimulate as it now 'has somewhere to go to'. By going earlier similar (or do the handling called for) you will nail down the source of the BPC and find what in Axiom 37 is called Basic Truth. You will get TA action and F/N VGI's as a result.

 

There is no reason to try to guess 
what kind of BPC the pc is sitting in. 
   A good Assessment and the handling   
takes care of it. The theory behind 
BPC also explains why it is so 
important not to Q and A, but 
finish each auditing cycle begun.



Each Correction List is put together to cover a type of action or general area. The famous C/S 53 is thus covering all the reasons for high or low TA. High/Low TA are caused by certain types of unhanded charge in restimulation on the case. In the instance of chronic high or low TA this list is assessed on the pc and the causes for the out of range TA are located. (Occasional high or low TA on a process is of course handled by completing the process to EP).

Methods of Assessment
There are two principal methods of Assessment used to do Correction Lists with:

Method 3: (M3) The list is assessed on a Meter, reading line after line to the pc. When a read is noted it means some BPC has been found. The question is taken up right away. The auditor follows the instructions on the list to handle this BPC to F/N VGI.

Method 5: (M5) Here the whole list is assessed rapidly, without getting the pc to talk. The reads are simply noted for later use. They will all be F/N'ed eventually. Depending on the situation, the auditor either handles the reads right after the Assessment in a certain order - or returns the assessed list to the C/S for programming.

One special use of Method 5 is to assess all the way through and just indicate the major BPC to the pc. This can be used to handle an acute upset. This was discussed in "Cause of ARC Breaks - BPC".


TRs
And Metering
There are some factors that have to be stressed repeatedly: Whether or not a prepared list reads well and correctly depends upon the auditor's TRs and metering. The quality of TRs and metering makes a huge difference in prepared list response. It is the TRs and metering of the auditor that makes a Correction List reliable, not the list itself. It is thus important that the auditor keeps working on this. There are drills developed especially to improve the auditor's Assessment skills.

Included in Level 0-3 of CT are the most commonly used Correction Lists. They should cover 90% or better of the situations you can run into up to this level. A clever C/S should be able to handle just about any situation thrown at him with these lists and other tools included, like two way comm, Prep-checks, etc. There are two notorious tools missing at this level (they can be found in CT-4Pro):

(1) One is PTS handling. A PTS is a "Potential Trouble Source". This case condition is usually brought about by pc having people close to him, who are antagonistic to him and his progress through auditing. The auditing tech for handling this is part of Level 4Pro. A first important step in handling such a pc is not done in session but by Ethics. Physical action needs to take place. The pc is educated in these matters and the Ethics Officer helps him take control of the situation through advice and follow-up. Sometimes it has to be enforced with discipline. The basic condition the pc is in can be understood as a Problem (intention><Counter Intention) and a Present Time Problem (something the pc has his attention fixed upon). 

(2) Int Rundown Correction list is not included either. It has to be part of the whole theory. If the pc has Out-Int it can usually be handled with the included Int Remedy. Since this is run to key-out, it can be repeated. It can be overrun, however, and the EP should be found and rehabbed. But unless the pc has had an Int RD with Engram running, etc. this action is easily repaired. The full theory and Rd for Interiorization problems are included in Level 4 Pro.

The lists included are:

WCCL: The Word Clearing Correction List is the list to use when any form of Word Clearing runs into real trouble.

L1C: Used by auditors in session when an upset occurs, or as ordered by C/S. It handles ARC Broken, Sad, hopeless or nattery pc's. Questions can be prefaced with "Recently", "In this life", "On the Whole Track", or used without. It is not to be used to handle high or low TA.

L4 Short:
This is a short version of L&N correction. It contains all the most common errors. It is valid on listing & Nulling in progress or recently done. If it doesn't resolve the difficulties a full L4BRB can be used.

L4BRB:
Used to sort out all possible errors related to L&N. The L4 is designed to sort out an L&N action in progress. If that doesn't handle, there may be prior or other problems that need to be addressed. The L4BRB is thus designed to cover a broader area.

LCRE:
This list is used to repair Confessional Auditing. It is used in a Confessional session in progress per Confessional Procedure. It is also used to handle troubles from other O/W actions such as O/W write-ups. If the person after any such action has Bad Indicators or if he gets sick or upset or messes up, this list is assessed and handled.

GF:
The Green Form is used to detect the peculiarities and elements of a pc's life which are causing case trouble or preventing gains. (It is not used to cure high or low TA.)
Per Auditors Rights it can be used by the auditor in case the rudiments won't fly.

C/S 53: This list was originally designed to handle high or low TA. It is assessed M5 and the reads are handled in the sequence laid out on the list. It has been called "The Champion of Repair Lists", as it has proven itself to enable a good auditor to handle all kinds of case difficulties - way beyond cases with TA troubles; the C/S 53 is still the list to use for High/Low TA. C/S 53 contains "all the elements known to us that bring about case foul-ups."

False TA Check List:
This list is not assessed on the Meter. It is a check list to use, when False TA is suspected. It goes through all the physical causes (like dry or moist hands) that can cause the TA to be in a false range, that don't reflect the state of case.


 

How to Audit Correction Lists

There are certain skills to learn and certain rules to follow to successfully audit Correction Lists. First of all, you have to make sure your sensitivity on the Meter is set right. Set too low you won't be able to see the reads; set too high will obscure the reads of importance. You set your sensitivity per EM Drill 5 to a 1/3 of a dial drop for a correct can squeeze.
You need to arrange your tools, the Meter, the Correction List and the work sheets in such a way as to not overlook reads. Have your Meter in a position (line of sight) so you can see the list and the needle at the same time looking in one direction; and the needle and the pc at the same time looking in another direction. The Meter position is important.

 

It is important to arrange Meter, List 
   and Work Sheets in a way to be able   
to see Needle and List at the same 
time; or Pc and Needle at the same 
time. Also it is more important to see 
Pc's can grip than his face while 
assessing.

Place the Correction List close beside the Meter or in front of it. Write the pc's name and the date on top of the list. Have your worksheets more to the right. Keep a running record of the session on them.  Write what list you use on the work sheets with the time. The list remains in the pc's folder - stapled to the back of the report after the action is complete.

Clearing the Words 
You have to ensure, that the words on the list are cleared before you start to assess it. Common practice is to clear all the words for lists you may need well beforehand. As these lists are designed to handle BPC the best time is to do it at the very beginning when you start on a program. If you are going to do a Confessional you know you may need an LCRE sooner or later. So you clear the words for the list in the very first session of such a program. If the pc gets in trouble later you can just take the list out and use it. 
 

Method 3 Assessment
Here is how you do a Method Three Assessment: You read the question from the list to the pc (with good TR-1) and note any instant read. You do not read it while looking at the pc; you do not read it to yourself and then say it while looking at the pc. It is more important to see the pc's hands and can grip than his face as pc can move the cans around and cause false reads.

Auditor has to watch the Meter 
and deliver his Assessment question 
so it impinges on the pc and the Bank 
and catch the instant reads. 
 



Especially your TR-1 has to be good.  The pc has to clearly hear it. It has to impinge to get a read. There are a set of specific drills developed to improve Assessment skills, the Assessment Drills or TR-Q's.

You are looking for any Instant Read which occurs at the exact end of the last syllable of the question. If it does not read, mark the list x (for no read) and go on. If the list is being done through an F/N and the F/N just continues, mark the question F/N.

If the question reads, mark the read on your list at once (tick, SF, F. LF, LFBD, R/S). Write the number of the reading question on your work sheets.  Then look expectantly at the pc. You can repeat the question by just saying it again if pc doesn't begin to talk. He has probably already begun to answer as the question was charged. Note down what the pc says in short form. Note any TA change in your report.

If the pc's answer results in an F/N, VGIs, note it down quickly and say, "Thank you. I would like to indicate your needle is floating". You circle the F/N on your list and write IND for "indicated to pc".
There is no reason to wait endlessly for the pc to say more. That is basically out TR-2. If you just sit there the pc will go into doubt and find something to say. Just pay attention and ack when he is done. Good crisp control and being attentive to the pc is what makes Method 3 a smooth and fast action.

So you ack pc when he looks like he has said it and is pausing. If there is no F/N, you ask for an earlier similar to the question asked. The earlier similar should contain the statement/question that reads. If the read was on 'Has some affinity been rejected?' you would ask: "Was there an earlier similar time some affinity was rejected" It's a good idea to work on the E/S questions in drilling. You always take a read to F/N.

You can look at the pc when you say the E/S question, but you don't have to. The important thing in M3 is getting Meter response and not missing reads - and keep up enough speed to keep the pc busy. The pc will answer. If he comes to a "looks like he thinks he said it" and no F/N, you ack and ask the same E/S as above.

You ask for "earlier similars" until you finally get an F/N and VGIs. Then you indicate the F/N to the pc. That completes the handling of that particular line.

You mark your list with 'F/N' next to the original read. Then you go on to the next question on the list. You call the questions while keeping a close eye on your needle. If a line doesn't read you simply mark it 'x'.

When the next question from that list reads, you mark the read on the list and note the question number on your work sheets. You again get the pc's answer, follow the above E/S procedure until you get an F/N and VGIs for the question. You ack and indicate the F/N and return to your list. You keep this up until the upset and BPC is handled or you are through the whole list.

If the pc volunteers an answer, but there is no read (there can be an instant read on his statement), you don't take it up. You handle it with TR-4 and carry on with your list. You have to trust your Meter. And the rule is: Do not take up things that don't read. Don't act on  "hunches" either. If you disregard your Meter, the pc is left  to run his own case by answering non-reading questions with disaster as a result.
And let us repeat: keep an eye on pc's hands.
If pc moves around with the cans you can get false reads and it can obscure the real ones.

Ending and Big Win
If halfway down the handling of a prepared list using Method Three, the pc on some question gets a wide F/N, big cog, VGIs, the auditor is justified in calling the list complete and go to the next C/S action or ending the session.

Green Form  and M3
When a GF is audited Method 3 the auditor ends off at the first F/N, VGIs. This is used when rudiments won't fly (Auditors Rights) and in some other instances. To continue can cause the TA to go high suddenly. The pc feels he is being over-repaired. The clearing up of the F/N VGI item on the Green Form handled it - now pc is going into a protest. The protest sends the TA up.

Although doing a GF M3 has its uses, the GF is best done by Method 5 - assessed once through for reads, then the reads are handled. Other lists are best done Method 3 (such as L1C).

The above steps and actions are exactly how you do Method 3, Auditing by List. We F/N everything that reads by E/S or with a process to handle (per your individual list instructions). You may of course have to check for false read if the pc shows signs of this. You may have to put in the buttons 'Suppress' and 'Invalidate' to turn a Tick into a valid read (SF or larger). Never tell the pc whether it read or didn't read as this puts pc's attention on the Meter and violates Auditors Code.
Method 3 is not used on high or very low TAs to get them down or up.

Done properly these lists clean up a lot of By-passed Charge. The auditor should drill M3 and do the various lists on a doll with a coach giving situations. The primary Meter Drills would be EM 19 and EM 24.
 

Method 5
To assess a Correction List M5 was defined as: "Method 5, here the whole list is assessed rapidly, without getting the pc to talk. The reads are simply noted for later use. They will all be F/N'ed eventually. Depending on the situation, the auditor either handles the reads right after the Assessment in a certain order - or returns it to the C/S for programming." 
You would usually R-factor the pc with: "I am going to assess a list the whole way through to find charged areas. You do not have to say anything as what I am looking for at this stage is Meter reactions, but you are free to do so, if something important comes to mind". You can add: "Please make sure to hold the cans still and don't shift your grip". It's important to let the pc understand that he can of course originate - or he would immediately drift out of session and leave the Meter less responsive.

Method 5 could be said to be the more in-depth use of Correction Lists. It also puts the auditor's Assessment skills to the test. The Meter coaching instructions of Level 0 are very relevant and should be used in drilling this action. Also, the specific drills developed to improve Assessment skills, the Assessment Drills or TR-Q's are used. 

M5 is sometimes the preferred method for C/Ses handling green auditors, as the auditor can assess the whole list through and return the outcome to C/S. Then the auditor can get a step by step follow-up C/S, that he can study for and drill before going into session again. In Ron Hubbard's words: "Where you have inexpert auditors you always order Method 5, which is just a full rapid Assessment. Then the C/S sorts out the reads and C/Ses what to do as very well covered on the lists themselves and the C/S Series. Then the auditor does the C/S."

But M5 is usually done to get an in-depth look at the case in an easy manner in order to handle the charge revealed in the right order. The general rule is to take up items in order of the largest read. There is however an important exception to this.

 

   To undo 'The Worst Tangle" is   
delicate business. Out-Int, 
Out L&N and Out Ruds at 
the same time has to be 
handled in that order. The 
C/S 53 makes it a doable task. 

Out-Int - Out L&N - Out Ruds
C/S 53 calls for taking up the reads in the order they appear on the list. That is because there is a detection of special case outnesses and the know-how of how to handle it built into this list. The rule is: If you have anything connected with Out-Int, you handle that first. It is considered the most important case factor to address. Out-Int makes other auditing impossible and it is a more serious offense to audit a case over Out-Int than over an ARC break. The next thing to take up is anything connected with Out L&N. Again, out lists cause a serious BPC as expressed in Law #12 of L&N. The next thing would be different types of out rudiments - starting with ARC breaks. If you have Out-Int, Out Lists and Out Ruds all in a ball it is called "The Worst Tangle" and these factors have to be handled in the above order to be sorted out. That is built right into C/S 53 and that is why you do it in the order the reads appear on the list - regardless of size. The Worst Tangle rule applies to all auditing by lists as these case outnesses have to be repaired in that order.


Green Form M5
The Green Form is a precision tool which covers the things troubling a case that no other list will detect. It is not intended to correct session errors or cure high or low TA. It specializes in picking up the oddities and elements of a pc's life which are out of view in normal auditing and which cause a case to behave in an unusual manner. The case may not be what we call resistive, just odd or troubled or not making sense, and the Green Form is the list to use to sort it out. It is an excellent C/S tool for getting an overview of a case and getting it straightened out. It can be used as part of Life Repair.

The C/S can use the results 
of a M5 Assessment to make 
up a program for the pc to 
   address his specific problems.   
C/S 53 and Green Form are 
the most used lists for this.

As mentioned, you can assess it Method 3 and handle, not going beyond the first F/N VGIs, when ruds won't fly at the start of session; but its real use is to assess it Method 5 and then send the result to the C/S for programming.

Out-Int is always handled first. Then List outnesses. Then ruds like ARC Breaks, W/Hs and PTPs. Then more or less by the longest reads.

C/S 53
There are two versions of the C/S 53, Short and Long Version. The Short Form is the basic prepared list used  to get a high or low TA into  normal range or to correct case outnesses. It contains every element that could be wrong with the mind as headlines or buttons. It is written the way it is because we just want to know if a subject reads on the pc's case; if it does it is handled to F/N.

The C/S 53 Long Form covers actually exactly the same areas the short form does; but it puts the items into full questions so a less educated pc can understand them easier. The more specific questions limits its use a bit by making the questions more specific. The open 'buttons type' questions of the short form are to prefer, when possible.

Both Short- and Long Form are assessed Method 5. The order the reads are taken up in is built into the lists themselves. You can't audit a case on anything else if Int is out. Auditing must be very limited if L&N is out. If you audit over an ARC break very long the pc will go into a sad effect. If you audit over a problem the pc won't make case gain. If you audit over a Withhold the pc may blow up at you. If you look at all these hard learned lessons you will see that the list itself takes care of that. It is a declining order of urgencies. It is true for C/S53 all the way down the list.

Assess and Indicate
There are two principal ways to use a C/S 53. The first is to simply to assess it to the end and only indicate the largest read. This is the old Assess and Indicate the BPC (ARC break Assessment). It is still very useful in handling blown students or pc's. You assess all the way through. You find 'Kicked out of spaces' had the largest read. You say "I want to indicate 'Kicked out of spaces' was the most charged item". You invite the pc to tell you about it without giving another formal auditing command and usually you will have a big BD F/N right there. This method will get off charge and get pc's and students back and more comfortable. This method, the ARC break Assessment, is not classified as auditing. It is "Between the Meter and the pc's Bank".

A C/S 53 can even be  used in a D of P interview when little is known about the pc. By assessing and getting the reads you can program the pc. You would conclude the interview simply by indicating the largest read which would get an F/N and the pc will go away happy while the C/S is making a full auditing program for him.


Auditing by Lists
The other way is its proper use in session. This use is called 'Auditing by Lists' and is classified as auditing. After completing the M5 Assessment you simply start at the first read and handle it. Go to the next read and handle it, etc. Note that this is different from the general rule for handling prepared lists where you simply take the largest read and next largest read and so forth.

That an item reads, with the exception of Out-Int, does not mean you have to do a full Rundown at that point. You just have to F/N it. If further actions are desired to take an item to full handling you put it onto the pc's  future auditing program. This includes drug handling, etc.
If Int reads you handle it fully because no auditing can take place over Out-Int. If he has already had a full Int RD (with Engram running) you would run the Recall Int Rundown after any errors in the Engram Int RD has been repaired.

The purpose of the C/S 53 is to key out things that are bothering the pc and get anything found on the list to an F/N. That something reads (except Int) does not mean the auditor doing the C/S 53 must at once run up 99 hours of auditing before he can finish the list. Auditors have to realize this or they can get stuck on a C/S 53 and go on forever. It can, as mentioned, be used for case analysis and programming, but that is a choice the C/S makes.

Its primary purpose is to get the case flying so you can do some action that is planned for the pc and which he is there to get delivered. To get that done rather quickly you simply follow the instructions on the list. 

 The C/S 53 has many uses as it does after all contain "all the elements known to us that bring about case foul-ups". Unless you run into the necessity to do an Int handling or you goof or get false reads you can F/N a whole C/S 53 rather quickly.


C/S 53 to F/Ning List
You can take a C/S 53 to an F/Ning list by doing a repeated M5 on it. First you  handle any Out-Int  as needed; then you handle the rest of the items, each to F/N as described above.

You then do an M5 on the whole C/S 53 again. You may pick up an additional read or two. You F/N these. Hopefully, if Int is now handled properly,  it won't read or read again. But if it does, you handle per Recall Int RD data.

You then Method 5 the C/S 53 again. You will probably get an F/Ning Assessment throughout. If you don't you simply Method 5 it again.

The auditor would still end off a specific session on a persistent F/N and continue later. The objective is to find the charge available. So the auditor would not call such a persistent F/N for an F/Ning list but end off, let the pc have his win and then in another later session continue with the list. You do not audit over a big win for two reasons: It is invalidates the win and any charge still there won't register as the pc is not In-session.

The eventual EP of getting a prepared list to F/N will occur unless the auditor's metering or TRs, or handling of the list are badly out (this assuming the pc needed the list in the first place). The thing to do if the auditor can't take it to F/Ning list is to get another auditor to do it or get the auditor to study and drill some more, as frankly, F/Ning a C/S 53 is quite doable.

Note: An older system, and still valid, was to assess the list M5 and handle per above. This could be done repeatedly until everything seemed to be handled. Then you would assess the list M3. On each item you would put in suppress and invalidate and either get a read or an F/N. You would take up reads right away. If there still were things to handle and not an F/N on each line, you would repeat the M3. The full EP of an F/Ning list is the same, that each item can be F/Ned, with or without use of the buttons, and without any charge showing up. 

Taking a C/S 53 to F/Ning list is relatively easy to do and can produce a remarkable resurgence of case. It's an easy and simple way to do a set-up for a major Rundown.

There is no other document in history that has rounded up so completely the factors which can be wrong with the mind. And also put it on one sheet of paper as C/S 53 SF does.


Each Correction List contains detailed instructions on when and how to use it, including instructions on method of Assessment - several of the lists can be used both M3 and M5. We refer to the links below to the actual lists with their instructions.

WCCL: The Word Clearing Correction List is the list to use when any form of Word Clearing runs into real trouble. Any and all troubles with Word Clearing should be corrected by assess and handle this list. The WCCL has been designed to handle errors made in Word Clearing. It is not to be used to try to correct study or the person's case. It is used in in context with Word Clearing actions to correct Word Clearing errors only.

LCRE: This list is used to repair Confessional Auditing. It is used in a Confessional session in progress per Confessional Procedure. It is also used to handle troubles from other O/W actions such as O/W write-ups. If the person after any such action has Bad Indicators or if he gets sick or upset or messes up, this list is assessed and handled.

L1C: Used by Auditors in session when an upset occurs, or as ordered by C/S. It handles ARC Broken, Sad, hopeless or nattery pc's. Questions can be prefaced with "Recently" "In this life" "On the Whole Track" or used without. It is not to be used to handle high or low TA.

L4 Short: This is a short version of list correction. It contains all the most common errors. It is valid on listing in progress or recently done. If it doesn't resolve the difficulties a full L4BRB can be used.

L4BRB:
Used to sort out all possible errors related to L&N. The L4 is designed to sort out an L&N action in progress. If that doesn't handle, there may be prior or other problems that need to be addressed. The L4BRB is thus designed to cover a broader area.

GF: The Green Form is used to detect the peculiarities and elements of a pc's life which are causing case trouble or preventing gains. (It is not used to cure high or low TA.)
Per Auditors Rights it can be used by the auditor in case the rudiments won't fly. In this case it is assessed Method 3 and handled, not going beyond F/N VGIs. But its real use is Method 5 and then sent to C/S for programming.

C/S 53 Short Form: This list was originally designed to handle high or low TA. It is assessed M5 and the reads are handled in the sequence laid out on the list. It has been called "The Champion of Repair Lists", as it has proven itself to enable a good auditor to handle all kinds of case difficulties - way beyond cases with TA troubles - although C/S 53 is still the list to use for High/Low TA. C/S 53 contains " all the elements known to us that bring about case foul-ups."

C/S 53 Long Form:
This is basically the same list as C/S 53 SF. The difference is, that it uses full statements or questions, while C/S 53 SF uses only key words in the Assessment. C/S LF is thus designed to be used if an Assessment of C/S 53 SF does not resolve the situation, as that would indicate that the charge simply hasn't been made to read. Also, it is sometimes used on beginning pc's as it can be easier to make to read on them.

Hi-Lo TA Assessment List. Basically the same as above, but with many additional questions.

False TA Check List:
This list is not assessed on the Meter. It is a check list to use, when False TA is suspected. It goes through all the physical causes (like dry or moist hands) that can cause the TA to be in a false range, that does not reflect the state of case.

TR Debug List: It is used on students doing the TRs course if they have persistent troubles.

INT REMEDY: This is not a Correction List, but a remedy that can be used where an Int handling is called for on one of the above lists.

Assessment Drills: These are drills, called TR-Q's. The dills cover an auditor's ability to do Assessment to perfection. Good Assessment skills and the ability to get prepared lists to read accurately are vital to uniform results. Also the Meter coaching instructions of Level 0 are very relevant and should be used in drilling this action.

 

 

 

Home  Search Level 0  Level 1  Level 2  Level 3  Level 4  Level 4Pro  Level 5  C/Sing  Solo

| Tech terms | Scales | Axioms | Drills | Checksheets | Processes | Prep. lists | C/S terms | C/S tool | Grades | Cramm | Points | KTW | Online |

to top

Clearbird Publishing, 2005 | Jo Seagull |
|